Adding a Social Marketing Campaign to a School-Based Nutrition Education Program Improves Children’s Dietary Intake: A Quasi-Experimental Study

Abstract

Background

Evidence supports the use of social marketing campaigns to improve nutrition knowledge and reinforce the effects of nutrition education programs. However, the additional effects of parent-focused social marketing with nutrition education have received little attention.

Objective

Our aim was to assess the impact of the Iowa Nutrition Network’s school-based nutrition education program (Building and Strengthening Iowa Community Support for Nutrition and Physical Activity [BASICS]) and the benefits of adding a multichannel social marketing intervention (BASICS Plus) to increase parent-directed communication.

Design and intervention

A quasi-experimental design with three study conditions compared a school-based nutrition education program (BASICS) with a school-based and social marketing intervention (BASICS Plus) and a no-treatment comparison group.

Participants/setting

The study included 1,037 third-grade students attending 33 elementary schools and their parents.

Main outcome measures

Measures included parents’ reports of their children’s in-home consumption of fruits and vegetables (F/V) and use of low-fat/fat-free milk. Data on F/V were collected using a modified version of the University of California Cooperative Extension Food Behavior Checklist; and data on milk use were collected using two questions from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Statistical analyses

Multilevel, mixed-effect regression models that account for correlation within repeated measures and children within school were used to compare the mean change over time in the outcome variable for one study group with the mean change over time for another study group.

Results

Children in BASICS increased mean consumption of fruit by 0.16 cups (P=0.04) compared with children in the comparison group. Children in BASICS Plus increased mean consumption of fruit by 0.17 cups (P=0.03) and mean consumption of vegetables by 0.13 cups (P=0.02). Children in BASICS Plus were 1.3 times (P=0.05) more likely to use low-fat/fat-free milk than children in either the BASICS group or the comparison group.

Conclusions

Gaining parents’ attention and engaging them in healthy eating practices for their children can be a useful way to increase the effectiveness of school-based nutrition education programs. This study demonstrates the benefits of incorporating a parent-focused social marketing campaign in nutrition education interventions.

Advertisements

Published by: davidgerting

I'm 32, I live in Westminster Md. For the longest time I struggle to figure out what I want to do for a living. Until I realize for the last 4 or so years, everything I love doing was about health and fitness so about 2 years ago. I decided to go to school for exercise science I got my A.A degree then I processed to study for the National Academy sports medicine (NASM) exam after I pass I started my journey to try different workouts and different meal plans I even start my education trying to became a dietitian hopefully I'll be a RD in the next 2 years through out the day I strive to learn as much as I can. Now I can honestly say, I can help anyone the wants to lose weight gain muscle or just over all want to be more healthier.

Categories Body's over all health functions improvement tips and Facts, Nutrition tips & FactsLeave a comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s